The small shop down the road

Every neighborough in Jakarta has these small shops down the road where one can run to and buy mobile phone credits (pulsa), a soft drink, the three in one powder mix to prepare a milk coffee. The shop in the photo is down our road. It is family run. Open from early morning to late evening seven days a week.

Vespa workshop

In Jakarta, in Kemang Timur, there is Vespa repair show. Actually, it is not a repair shop, it is a workshop where old Vespa piece are repaired and put together to give a new life to these wonderful and old motorbikes. When I walked by the workshop I stopped to listen to the noise from inside and the smell of the paint use for the main frame of a white Vespa. There are few of these workshops in tow and several Vespa clubs, one of them is even called Pontedera!

Rainy season

It is a long rainy season this year in Jakarta. When rain starts these young men appear next to the door of the office tower where I work. It happens all over the city. They appear and accompany under their umbrella the people who need to walk to the near coffee place, the motorbikes parking, of into a taxi. There si no negotiation on the price. A silent agreement. People just know how much to give them.

The alleys of Kemang

I always like to walk in the narrow alleys of Kemang, in the south part of Jakarta. People greet me. I stop for a quick chat. I discover interesting angles and details that I capture in a photo with my iPhone.

The Tjong A Fie Mansion in Medan

This is a very elegant two stories house. It has an internal yard with a nice soft light from the sky. Walking through the rooms, seeing old gramophones, faded mirrors, old family pictures in wodden frame, it is possible to imagine large family gatherings for the Chinese New Year.  This is what was once the house of the richest man in town and maybe the whole of Sumatra.

The Tjong A Fie Mansion in Medan

The Tjong A Fie Mansion is a two-story mansion in Medan, North Sumatra, built by Tjong A Fie (1860 – 1921) a Hakka merchant who came to own much of the land in Medan through his plantations, later becoming ‘Majoor der Chineezen’ (leader of the Chinese’) in Medan and constructing the Medan-Belawan railway. Tjong A Fie is said to be related to Cheong Fatt Tze, who built the Cheong Fatt Tze Mansion in Penang, Malaysia. The building is constructed in Chinese-European-Art Deco style, and was completed in 1900, and said to have been modeled on the Cheong Fatt Tze Mansion.

My camera got stolen, but I do not stop taking photos

As @tedforbes says: take pictures with whatever camera you have. This is dedicates to the guy who broke into our house the other night and stole (among other things) my Olympus camera and four great lenses. You are not stopping me, I continue more then ever to take photos of the streets of Jakarta. Here the one I took with my iphone this morning at Halte Senayan! 

Break time

There are many guards in Jakarta. They work at the gate of housing compounds, the entrance of office tower, at the malls and at some less known place like a music school in South Jakarta. They have long shift and sometime really need to take a break, if just for a moment.

Helsinki Senaatintori

Helsinki’s Senate Square (Senaatintori)  is dominated by the white church overlooking the surrounding buildings and standing high up on a steep flight of stone steps. A couple of years ago, it was in June I think, I got to Helsinki very early. I flew in from Singapore. I walked to the center waiting for coffee shops to open. It was a bright sunny morning and I headed to Senaatintori. It was early. The square was quiet. 

Senaatintori church, Helsinki

Morning reflection

Helsinki University

Senaatintori church, Helsinki

Walking by

The usual

Every Friday afternoon I spend an hour at the Dialogue art & coffee in South Jakarta. I sit for 45 minutes, waiting for my daughter to finish her piano lesson nearby.  It is a nice, modern coffee. There always new exhibitions. I sit at one if the tables and usually order a sparkling Equil. I then work on a blog or read sonething.

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Jumping off the bus, Halte Senayan (Jakarta)

For the last three years I have been cycling to work here in Jakarta. On my way to the office I have to walk across a pedestrian bridge over one of the stations of the Transjakarta bus line, Halte Senayan. A year or so ago I started to carry my camera and take photos from the bridge as well as under the bridge. Having the camera with me and taking photos every day has made me discover all what is going on here every day: the people commuting to work, the food sellers, the crowded minibuses Kopaja, the motorbikes drivers, the musicians, the workers at new Jakarta underground system. When I was walking pass Halte Senayan without my camera I missed most of that. I did not notice it. I was thinking about the day ahead, the meetings, the emails, etc. The pedestrian bridge and Halte Senayan was unremarkable, because I did not noticed all what is there. Having the camera with me was like opening my eyes to a place I am go through everyday, twice a day. Discovering it in a new way. Here some of the photos I have taken so far.

In the morning …

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In the morning the rush to the office towers where they work. They spent maybe an hour, an hour and half, maybe two hours on the road to commute and to get here. They now rush to be on time at their workplaces.

On duty

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Jalan Sudirman is a major roads that links south Jakarta to the center of the city. In the mornings at the rush hour the traffic moves slowly. Busses, cars, motorbikes. Near the pedestrian bridge I cross every day, I often see this man who is on duty and keeps the sides of the road clean.  Here he was walking south, having a moment for himself.

Kopaja P 19

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Kopaja P 19 on Jl Sudirman, Jakarta

For the last three years I have been cycling to work here in Jakarta. On my way to the office I have to walk across a pedestrian bridge over one of the stations of the Transjakarta bus line, Halte Senayan. A year or so ago I started to carry my camera and take photos from the bridge as well as under the bridge. Having the camera with me and taking photos every day has made me discover all what is going on here every day: the people commuting to work, the food sellers, the crowded minibuses Kopaja, the motorbikes drivers, the musicians, the workers at new Jakarta underground system. When I was walking pass Halte Senayan without my camera I missed most of that. I did not notice it. I was thinking about the day ahead, the meetings, the emails, etc. The pedestrian bridge and Halte Senayan was unremarkable, because I did not noticed all what is there. Having the camera with me was like opening my eyes to a place I am go through everyday, twice a day. Discovering it in a new way. Here some of the photos I have taken so far.

 

18 seconds of sunset in Belitung

 

 

I took this sequence of photos at sunset on the island of Belitung, on the east of South Sumatra, Indonesia.

The street photography rules I have

Few days ago I posted this photo on Instagram.

File 9-6-16 16 11 46 2

 

A friend, who is following my account, then sent me a questions in the comments section: how do I deal with ethics in my street photography. Good question.

Over the years, I have been reading a lot about street photography: the beauty of black & white photography, street photography techniques, the best cameras and lenses, and, last but not least, blogs where professional and amateur street photographers wrote about their do and don’t in street photography.

One blog that I remember more vividly is the one by Lilly Schwartz . In one of her blog post she lists the rules she follows when taking photographs of strangers in the street.

During the last few days I have been re-thinking what I consider right or wrong in doing street photography.

While there is a great degree of subjectivity on which rules we apply to ourselves, I think that above those subjective rules there is (at least for me) a more universal rule which is about respect to others and of ‘not doing harm’ when taking photos of people in the streets.

The specific rules that I have for myself and which I try to follow  come under this general principle and are subjective in the sense that they are shaped and defined by the values I have been given through my education and upbringing, my own character and what I feel comfortable to do (and not to do) .

1. I never take a picture of homeless people of any age. Not even by asking them whether I can. I just do not do it. It does not feel right to me. I did it once, about 10 years ago while walking in the street of Old Delhi near the Red Fort. The moment I took the photo, I knew I was doing something wrong. I have not done it ever since.

2. I ask, whenever possible, if I can to take a photo of someone. Here in Jakarta I speak enough Bahasa Indonesia to have a chat and ask if I can take a photo. Most of the times the people I meet are happy for me taking a photo of them and showing them the result on the LCD screen. People often ask me to take their picture particularly when they are in a group. If someone says no; no problem. A smile, an apology, and all is good.

3. There are cases like the photo above where I cannot ask permission to take the photo. The man was on a bus moving quickly along a busy road in Jakarta. However, I do not feel I am stealing something. My aim is document the common everyday life of people living in cities. I am not a professional photographer and do not make money out of the photos I take. I share my photos through my blog and social media as a way to share with a larger community a moment, a split second that for a reason or another I felt was worth capturing to contribute to telling a story that is unfolding every day, every hour, every minute in a city.

4. If a person has second thoughts and ask me to delete the photo I can do it in front of their eyes showing the LCD screen. However, this is not happened to me yet.

5. I tend not to use telephoto lenses for street photography. I usually take photos with a 35mm equivalent or a 50mm equivalent lens. This means that people do notice me and it is easier to ask for permission. I would use a zoom to take a photo of a crowded place from a distant view point.

6. I only take pictures of children when they play happily or together with their parents.

Again, thank you to my friend for asking what rules I follow for my street photography which has made me to write this blog.

Royal Botanical Garden in Kandy

I have been looking into my photos database to look for photos to add to my black&white series. Here few photos I took at the Royal Botanical Garden in Kandy, Sri Lanka in 2005.

Sri Lanka

Royal Botanical Gardens, Peradeniya

Sri Lanka

Royal Botanical Gardens, Peradeniya

Sri Lanka

Royal Botanical Gardens, Peradeniya

Sri Lanka

Royal Botanical Gardens, Peradeniya

Sri Lanka

Royal Botanical Gardens, Peradeniya

Dreaming the future 35/35 -35 days 35 photos 35mm

35 days 35 photos 35mm

Dreaming the future

Dreaming the future and making it happen. Jakarta is building the Mass Transport System. There will be tube stations like this one. Will there be more people and passangers that this photo? I hope so, otherwise the project will go broke pretty soon. Some people say that this massive project is too little too late and that the traffic congestion in Jakarta is so severe that it is beyond rescue. There is one way: how about giving more space to bicycle commuters? Create incentives like tax deductions, or pay back for spare parts or simply showers in office towers.

I set out to take one photo per day for 35 days using my Olympus 17mm f1.8 lens which produces an equivalent field of view of approximately 35mm. It was a project like many others. What I wanted to do was to force myself to see things I see (or better I do not see) on my way to office. I also wanted to walk in the kampung near my home in Jakarta and see what is there and how people live through  the lens of my camera. I wanted to put a target. A project with a beginning and an end. And now it has reached its end. I saw that the streets of this city are chocked by traffic. It cannot go on like this. This is paralisis. This is health hazard. This is pollution. This is not sustainable. I very few cyclists using their bicycle to go to work. Too few of them. I am one of them. There are no bicycle lanes or any other protetcion for cyclists in this crazy traffic. I saw ojek drivers whom I see every days who said: ‘Ok, you can take a photo of me.’

Thsi project forced me to look for something interesting every day for 35 days and not taking for granted the spots and people I was passing by every day. I am happy I did it. Thanks for following me!

 

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